Posts Tagged ‘richest man in the cemetery’

DOT ONE: When Steve Jobs launched Apple with Steve Wozniak in 1976, they decided to name the company after the fruit that according to legend spurred Isaac Newton’s theories on gravity. Jobs then spent most of his life defying gravity, and defying the odds.

DOT TWO: Starting with the premise that the best ideas are already out there, Jobs negotiated with Xerox to grant Apple engineers access to the Xerox PARC facilities in return for selling them one million dollars in pre-IPO Apple stock. It was from this visit that Jobs collected the ideas behind the fundamentals of today’s PC – the graphic user interface, mouse and pointer.

DOT THREE: How did Jobs go from start-up to listed company in four years? By getting his mentors to work for him. Jobs brought on a local VC, Mike Markkula, who bought shares in the company and subsequently became CEO. He brought in Regis McKenna, the best public relations man in Silicon Valley, to market the Apple II. Markkula was responsible for the early financing of the company, and for taking Apple public in 1980.

DOT FOUR: Despite becoming worth $217 million when Apple listed, Jobs kept relying purely on his intuition. Apple’s head of marketing, Mike Murray, commented, “Steve did his market research by looking into the mirror every morning.” Sales stalled, Jobs’ management style was seen by his board as a liability and, in 1985, he was thrown out of the company he had started nine years earlier.

DOT FIVE: That might have been the end of another entrepreneur story, was it not for Jobs’ perseverance. Having left Apple, he launched NeXT, to provide PCs to the education market. Apple sued Jobs for launching in competition, prompting him to say, “It’s hard to think that a $2 billion company with 4,300 plus people couldn’t compete with six people in blue jeans.” Jobs sold all but one of his Apple shares, and Apple continued to languish, falling from 20% market share to under 5% by 1996. Jobs, in the meantime, struggled with NeXT, burning through $250 million of investors’ money as he tried to market his new computers.

DOT SIX: In the same year that Jobs founded NeXT, George Lucas was looking to sell a small computer animation group he owned. Disney rejected an offer to buy 50% for $15 million, and a deal to sell to Ross Perot and Phillips for $30 million fell through. Jobs ended up negotiating Lucas to under $10 million for the business, thinking he could market the high-end animation computers that the group had designed.

DOT SEVEN: Renamed ‘Pixar’, Jobs’ new company began marketing the Pixar Image Computer to the medical market – with little success. By 1989, with Pixar losing over $1 million each month, and NeXT faring little better, Jobs found himself left with less than 20% of the $150 million he had received when he sold his Apple stock. At the rate he was going, within two years he would be back to zero.

DOT EIGHT: Taking drastic measures, Jobs sold the hardware side of Pixar for several million, taking a massive loss. By luck, an animated short movie the Pixar team produced in their spare time, “Tin Toy”, received an Oscar, and in 1993, Disney approved a full feature joint venture with Pixar called “Toy Story”.

DOT NINE: The victory was short lived with Disney shutting production of Toy Story down later in the year after losing confidence in the script. Then in 1994, Disney lost four executives in a helicopter crash, including Chief Operating Officer Frank Wells. Jobs was left attempting to get Toy Story back on track while also having to close the NeXT manufacturing facility and sales operation. Most of the NeXT team left. The investors, having put in another $100 million, saw that money disappear too. Toy Story, now back on Disney’s agenda, it would need to earn at least $100 million for Pixar to make any money from it at all; more than any other Disney film had made at the time.

DOT TEN: Even so, an audacious Jobs, down to his last dollar, decided to bet that not only would Toy Story be a success, it would enable him to publicly list Pixar and raise further funds. In November 1995, Toy Story opened to enormous acclaim, becoming the highest grossing release of the year, generating over $450 million in sales. One week later, Pixar had its IPO. Less than twelve months after his worst year financially, Steve Jobs was a billionaire.

DOT ELEVEN: Then, in 1996, Gil Emilio (the new CEO of Apple) went hunting for a new operating system and finally found it… in NeXT. Approaching Jobs for his system, Jobs was only interested in selling the entire company. Apple bought it for $377.5 million in cash and $1.5 million in Apple shares. In one fell swoop, Jobs could pay off all his investors and was involved with Apple again – after over ten years.

DOT TWELVE: In 1997 Apple sales were $7 billion and losses were over $1 billion. Jobs took to the challenge of revitalizing Apple. By 1998, Jobs launched the iMac, followed with the iPod, iPhone and iPad. The rise of Apple to become the most valuable company in the world are well documented, but less is known of the trials that shaped Jobs in his darker times.

DOT THIRTEEN: In January 2006, Disney (having rejected the chance to buy 50% of Pixar for $15 million ten years earlier) bought a transformed Pixar from Jobs for $7.4 billion in stock, making Jobs Disney’s largest individual shareholder and a billionaire for the third time.

To become a billionaire is already rare. To become a billionaire from scratch (or from $1 billion in losses) in three entirely different industries is unprecedented.

Jobs died today with a net worth of over $8 billion after having worked for $1 a year for the last 14 years.

Many people have heard his quote “Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me… Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful… that’s what matters to me.”

What most don’t know was that this was from a quote in the Wall Street Journal in Summer 1993 – Not when he was sitting on a billion dollars, but in his darkest days, outcast from Apple and the Tech community, struggling with both NeXT and an aimless Pixar, and about to run out of money.

That was Steve.

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Finding the motivation to carry out our goals is a challenge faced by many people. Though reflecting on areas of your life that need to change is a great starting point, you need motivational drive to actually implement these changes. Many people are skilled at reflecting inward and creating a list of accomplishments and tasks they wish to achieve, but then they stop there. As months and days pass by, they either find themselves criticizing their failures or ignoring their goals altogether. The culprit in all of these scenarios is that people lack the motivation necessary to follow through. However, once you learn how to get and stay motivated, you will be on the path to finding the success and happiness you’ve been looking for.

Here are 6 Fail-Proof ways that you can set and accomplish even your wildest of goals.

Creating Reality-Based Goals

To have motivation, you need to have attainable goals. Nothing is as demotivating as setting targets that are too high to achieve. Wanting to be wealthy or skinny are not only vague and too broad, they are a long road to travel with no end in sight. Instead of wealthy, perhaps all you truly need is to implement a plan to pay down your credit cards. The point is that you need to set concise, clear end targets that you can achieve, or you will become unmotivated very quickly.

Build A Road Map For Each Goal

Now that you have a clear list of realistic end goals you want to achieve, it is time to build motivating road maps. Build a separate map for each area of your life you wish to change. There could be motivation maps for categories such as health, finances, career, relationships or any other area of self improvement that you desire to change.

At the bottom of the page, you would place “start,” which signifies where you are at this moment. At the top of the page, you will write your end goal. The important part of this process is filling in the space in between, which is comprised of smaller goals that will help you stay motivated and on the right track. If you were to plan a drive across the country, you would build your itinerary one step at a time. The same is true with a motivational road map. If your end goal is to change your career, for example, the first target would be getting your resume updated. The next in line might be to commit to checking the want ads every Sunday, and so on.

Celebrate Each Achievement

It is very important that you recognize and celebrate each motivational goal on your map. When you’ve achieved the first step, cross it off and pat yourself on your back. You are finally able to see that you are making progress, one step at a time. In the past, you lost your motivation because you didn’t have a plan in place. Your end goal felt overwhelming and too far away. But now you will stay motivated because you see that your targets are within reach, and each day you are one step closer.

Keep Your Eyes On The Motivational Road In Front Of You

Just like when you are driving, taking your eyes off of the road can be extremely dangerous. You can lose your motivation if your eyes are focused on other drivers out there. All that matters on your path to self improvement is you. It doesn’t matter if someone else has a better job, more money or a better physique. You will stay motivated if you understand that your goals are about being the best you that you can be. They are not about becoming someone else. So don’t get distracted while driving toward your targets and keep your eyes on the horizon.

Use Visualization Techniques For Constant Motivation

Your motivation road maps are your inspiration, so keep them close at hand, and see the progress you’ve made in each area of your life. People are motivated when they can see positive change at a glance. When people try to lose weight, seeing the numbers on the scale go down is very motivating. When a company sees their growth and success on a bar graph, they feel there is nothing they cannot accomplish. The same holds true for your own map. Keep looking at how far you’ve come, post it on a bulletin board or some area where you can be motivated by it each day. In addition, take time to relax and visualize what life will feel like when you reach your end goal.

Don’t Let Detours Keep You From Getting Back On Your Path

It is easy to lose motivation when challenges in life occur. Just like when traveling by car, there can be detours, the car can break down or the road can be closed altogether. Put simply, these things happen in life and cannot be avoided. The trouble lies when a setback permanently disrupts motivation. It is ok to put the car in park for a little while, to get your bearings straight – it doesn’t mean you’ve failed. However, do not let the unexpected erase all of your progress to date. Even the most difficult challenges in life such as loss, health concerns or losing a job, can have their own motivational road maps drawn to keep you on your path to self improvement. Remember that the key to happiness isn’t perfection, it is improving circumstances to be the best they can be. No matter what life hands you or what you need to improve, you will feel happier and more successful if you make a motivation road map for each area of your life, so that you can stay motivated to accomplish real change.

The following article appeared in the Harvard Business ReviewWhy have you been so successful in reaching some of your goals, but not others? If you aren’t sure, you are far from alone in your confusion.

It turns out that even brilliant, highly accomplished people are pretty lousy when it comes to understanding why they succeed or fail. In fact, decades of research on achievement suggests that successful people reach their goals not simply because of who they are, but more often because of what they do.

No.9 Get specific

When you set yourself a goal, try to be as specific as possible. “Lose 5 kilograms” is a better goal than “lose some weight,” because it gives you a clear idea of what success looks like. Knowing exactly what you want to achieve keeps you motivated until you get there. Also, think about the specific actions that need to be taken to reach your goal. Just promising you’ll “eat less” or “sleep more” is too vague — be clear and precise. “I’ll be in bed by 10 p.m. on weeknights” leaves no room for doubt about what you need to do, and whether or not you’ve actually done it.

No.8 Seize the moment to act on your goals

Given how busy most of us are, and how many goals we are juggling at once, it’s not surprising that we routinely miss opportunities to act on a goal because we simply fail to notice them. Did you really have no time to work out today? No chance at any point to return that phone call? Achieving your goal means grabbing hold of these opportunities before they slip through your fingers.

To seize the moment, decide when and where you will take each action you want to take, in advance. Again, be as specific as possible (e.g., “If it’s Monday, Wednesday, or Friday, I’ll work out for 30 minutes before work.”) Studies show that this kind of strategic planning will help your brain to detect and seize the opportunity when it arises, increasing your chances of success by roughly 300%.

No.7 Know exactly how far you have left to go

Achieving any goal also requires honest and regular monitoring of your progress — if not by others, then by you yourself. If you don’t know how well you are doing, you can’t adjust your behaviour or your strategies accordingly. Check your progress frequently — weekly, or even daily, depending on the goal.

No.6 Be a realistic optimist

When you are setting a goal, by all means engage in lots of positive thinking about how likely you are to achieve it. Believing in your ability to succeed is enormously helpful for creating and sustaining your motivation. But whatever you do, don’t underestimate how difficult it will be to reach your goal. Most goals worth achieving require time, planning, effort, and persistence. Studies show that thinking things will come to you easily and effortlessly leaves you ill-prepared for the journey ahead, and significantly increases the odds of failure.

No.5 Focus on getting better, rather than being good

Believing you have the ability to reach your goals is important, but so is believing you can get the ability. Many of us believe that our intelligence, our personality and our physical aptitudes are fixed — that no matter what we do, we won’t improve. As a result, we focus on goals that are all about proving ourselves, rather than developing and acquiring new skills.

Fortunately, decades of research suggest that the belief in fixed ability is completely wrong — abilities of all kinds are profoundly malleable. Embracing the fact that you can change will allow you to make better choices, and reach your fullest potential. People whose goals are about getting better, rather than being good, take difficulty in stride, and appreciate the journey as much as the destination.

No.4 Have grit

Grit is a willingness to commit to long-term goals, and to persist in the face of difficulty. Studies show that gritty people obtain more education in their lifetime, and earn higher grades.

The good news is, if you aren’t particularly gritty now, there is something you can do about it. People who lack grit more often than not believe that they just don’t have the innate abilities successful people have. If that describes your own thinking… well, there’s no way to put this nicely: you are wrong. As I mentioned earlier, effort, planning, persistence, and good strategies are what it really takes to succeed. Embracing this knowledge will not only help you see yourself and your goals more accurately, but also do wonders for your grit.

No.3 Build your willpower muscle

Your self-control “muscle” is just like the other muscles in your body — when it doesn’t get much exercise, it becomes weaker over time. But when you give it regular workouts by putting it to good use, it will grow stronger and stronger, and better able to help you successfully reach your goals.

To build willpower, take on a challenge that requires you to do something you’d honestly rather not do. Give up high-fat snacks, do 100 sit-ups a day, stand up straight when you catch yourself slouching, try to learn a new skill. When you find yourself wanting to give in, give up, or just not bother — don’t. Start with just one activity, and make a plan for how you will deal with troubles when they occur (“If I have a craving for a snack, I will eat one piece of fresh or three pieces of dried fruit.”) It will be hard in the beginning, but it will get easier, and that’s the whole point. As your strength grows, you can take on more challenges and step-up your self-control workout.

No.2 Don’t tempt fate

No matter how strong your willpower muscle becomes, it’s important to always respect the fact that it is limited, and if you overtax it you will temporarily run out of steam. Don’t try to take on two challenging tasks at once, if you can help it (like quitting smoking and dieting at the same time). And don’t put yourself in harm’s way — many people are overly-confident in their ability to resist temptation, and as a result they put themselves in situations where temptations abound. Successful people know not to make reaching a goal harder than it already is.

No.1 Focus on what you will do, not what you won’t do

Do you want to successfully lose weight, quit smoking, or put a lid on your bad temper? Then plan how you will replace bad habits with good ones, rather than focusing only on the bad habits themselves. Research on thought suppression (e.g., “Don’t think about white bears!”) has shown that trying to avoid a thought makes it even more active in your mind. The same holds true when it comes to behaviour — by trying not to engage in a bad habit, our habits get strengthened rather than broken.

If you want change your ways, ask yourself, What will I do instead? For example, if you are trying to gain control of your temper and stop flying off the handle, you might make a plan like “If I am starting to feel angry, then I will take three deep breaths to calm down.” By using deep breathing as a replacement for giving in to your anger, your bad habit will get worn away over time until it disappears completely.

From addicted2success.com.

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#10 – Sheryl Sandberg

Whilst Facebook was certainly very popular before she came on board in 2008, it was difficult to see how the site would make an income worthy of its valuation. Not only did she help meet those expectations that came with such a high valuation of a site yet to make a real income, she helped massively exceed them.

Since she came on board as Facebook’s number two, it’s user base increased more than 10 times to roughly 11% of the world’s population, and the business is on course to post massive profits that are rumoured to cause the company to be valued near the $100 billion mark, which is almost as much as half the GDP of Ireland. It was her task to monetize Facebook, and she did this very successfully.

She would have been much higher in the top ten if it wasn’t for the fact that Facebook was destined to conquer the world on account of it being a very good idea, but everything she was tasked to do, she did very well and deserve her place amongst the top ten women entrepreneurs.

#9 – JK Rowling

This single and struggling mother wrote a book that bought a generation of video gamers and tv addicts back to reading books to excercise their imaginations once again. Another rags to riches story, JK Rowling‘s Harry Potter books have become one of the best-selling books of all time, she managed to spawn a major feature film series and a franchise that also incorporates a fully functioning theme park in direct competition with Disney. Her influence not only affects millions of children around the world, but has also drawn many adults into her world.

#8 – Kate Middleton

Kate Middleton placed higher in the list than JK Rowling despite losing the influential British woman crown to her, but the media coverage speaks volumes. Kate is a woman that is going to take the world by storm as she settles into her role as a British ambassador and style icon. Some may criticize the impact of her charity work when compared to Princess Diana but she is promoting causes close to her heart and she should be applauded.

#7 – Lady Gaga

Whatever you think of her music and fashion tastes, theres no denying that she has become an extraordinary success within a very short space of time and one of the most successful women in music today. Earning Lady Gaga her spot as number 8 in the list of top female entrepreneurs.

Born Stefanie GermanottaLady Gaga is estimated to be worth nearly $100 million at the tender age of 25-years-old. The reason for her fortune is that unlike many of her peers, she actually writes her own music, netting her a huge income in royalties.

#6 – Susan Wojcicki

Susan Wojcicki can certainly claim to be one of the most influential women in business owing to her being Senior Vice President at search engine giant Google, Susan has been responsible for helping to turn a great idea into a very profitable idea. She is mostly in charge of the advertising revenue side of Google.

#5 – Melinda Gates

Although her husband Bill Gates is mostly responsible for their wealth, she has been responsible for talking him into co-founding a charitable organisation with the money made from Bill’s empire. Bill Gates has stated that when he dies, all of his $40 billion fortune will have been spent on good causes. Melinda & Bill Gates have already donated $27 billion to charitable causes.

#4 – Indra Nooyi

Born in Calcutta, India, Indra Nooyi is one of the most powerful women in business having held executive positions in many of the world’s top companies.

She is currently Chairwoman and CEO of Pepsico which is the second largest food and drink company on the planet. She has not only excelled in business but also in academia, earning degrees in Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics as well as an MBA in management in her native India, she then went on to earn a Master’s degree in Public and Private Management at Yale.

#3 – Angela Merkel

Great responsibility rests on this ladies shoulders as leader of Europe’s most powerful and richest economy, Germany. Her influence and persuasion skills are likely to affect millions of Europeans and billions of others around the world. The global economy effectively is in her hands.

Agela Merkel is Germany’s first female leader and her decisions are highly likely to impact the history of Germany.

#2 – Oprah Winfrey

No list of the top women entrepreneurs would be complete without Oprah.

Worth an estimated $2.7 billion, it’s no wonder she can afford to hand out free cars to her audience members, her fortune has been largely down to creating television that women love to watch. And not just being content with appearing on the TV, she has gone on to excel in many other forms of media. As for being influential, she has had president Obama on her show twice, amongst many other world-famous people and has donated 100s of millions to make this world a better place.

#1 – Cher Wang

Cher ranks so highly on this list as she is perhaps arguably the most successful female entrepreneur in the world. Her wealth is primarily of her own making rather than being down to working for a large firm or being born wealthy.

She spent many years manufacturing cell phones for other people which earned her a tidy fortune, it wasn’t until she set-up her own company HTC, that her wealth really took off. She has anestimated worth of $6.8 billion, her HTC smartphones have quickly gain notoriety and in 2010, accounted for 20% of the smartphone market.

You may not have heard of her, but she’s undoubtedly influential and her income is entirely down to her own wits rather than any other factor, that’s why Cher Wang deserves the number one spot on this list of the top ten most influential women entrepreneurs.

All of these women are successful entrepreneurs in their own right. All have had to overcome high odds of failure to reach their ultimate destination, and all have greatly influenced millions of people around the world. These successful female entrepreneurs have added so much to our lives and serve as great inspiration for other women wishing to emulate their successes.

 

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Tweeted by: Robert Kiyosaki@therealkiyosaki

Profile: Investor, Entrepreneur, Financial Education Advocate
and Bestselling Author of the Rich Dad Poor Dad series

 

 

Tweeted by: Jack Dorsey@jack

Profile: Creator, Co-founder and Chairman of Twitter; CEO of
Square.

 

 

Tweeted by: Tim Ferriss, @timferriss

Profile: Author of #1 NY Times bestsellers, The 4-Hour Body
and The 4-Hour Workweek, Japanophile, tea drinker,
tango world record holder, language learning fanatic.

 

 

Tweeted by: Grant Cardone, @GrantCardone

 

Profile: International Sales Training Expert, New York Times
Best Selling Author, Motivational Speaker, Top Twitter Sales
Expert 2012.

 

 

Tweeted by: Kim Kiyosaki, @kimkiyosaki

Profile: Author of Rich Woman, Investor, Philosopher, Speaker

 

 

Tweeted by: T. Harv Eker, @t_harv_eker

Profile: The Official T. Harv Eker Twitter Account. Author of
#1 NY Times bestselling book Secrets of the Millionaire Mind

 

 

Tweeted by: Elon Musk, @elonmusk

Profile: Creator Of Tesla, SpaceX, SolarCity & PayPal

 

 

Tweeted by: Mark Cuban, @mcuban

Profile: Entrepreneur/Owner Of The Mavericks

 

 

Tweeted by: Peter Jones, @dragonjones

Profile: Entrepreneur, Investor, founder of the UK’s 1st
Enterprise Academy. Creator of American Inventor
in US & Star of Dragons’ Den in UK.

 

 

 

Tweeted by: Farrah Gray, @RealFarrahGray

Profile: Farrah Gray Dubbed by Oprah Winfrey as an all-star
with priceless advice -O, The Oprah Magazine

 

 

Tweeted by: Daniel Pink, @danielpink

Profile: Author of: Drive, A Whole New Mind, The Adventures
of Johnny Bunko, & Free Agent Nation.

 

 

Tweeted by: Les Brown, @lesbrown77

Profile: Speaker-Author-Speech Coach. Empowering individuals
to tap into their greatness.

 

 

Tweeted by: Tony Robbins@tonyrobbins

Profile: The Official Tony Robbins Account

 

 

Tweeted by: Kevin Liles, @KevinLiles1

Profile: Mr. Make It Happen

 

 

Tweeted by: Marcus Buckingham, @mwbuckingham

Profile: Strength strategist, author, researcher

 

 

Tweeted by: Dr. Wayne W Dyer, @drwaynewdyer

Profile: Bestselling Author

 

 

Tweeted by: Gary Vaynerchuk, @Garyvee

Profile: Family 1st! but after that, Businessman- a dude that
Loves the hustle, people & the NY Jets.
Tasted wine for years online!

 

 

Tweeted by: 50 Cent,@50Cent

Profile: It’s the kid 50 Cent | G-Unit

 

 

Tweeted by: Mark V Hansen, @markvhansen

Profile: Official Twitter account of America’s Ambassador of
Possibility. Author, speaker, passionate philanthropist and
humanitarian.

 

 

Tweeted by: Stephen R Covey, @StephenRCovey

Profile: Author of international bestseller: The 7 Habits of

Highly Effective People.

 

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Broadly considered a brand that inspires fervour and defines cool consumerism, Apple has become one of the biggest corporations in the world, fuelled by game-changing products that tap into modern desires. Its leader, Steve Jobs, was a long-haired college dropout with infinite ambition, and an inspirational perfectionist with a bully’s temper. A man of contradictions, he fused a Californian counterculture attitude and a mastery of the art of hype with explosive advances in computer technology.

Insiders including Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, the chairman who ousted Jobs from the company he founded, and Jobs’ chief of software, tell extraordinary stories of the rise, fall and rise again of Apple with Steve Jobs at its helm.

With Stephen Fry, world wide web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee and branding guru Rita Clifton, Evan Davis decodes the formula that took Apple from suburban garage to global supremacy.

Bio:
Steven Paul Jobs (February 24, 1955 — October 5, 2011) was an American businessman and inventor widely recognized as a charismatic pioneer of the personal computer revolution. He was co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Apple Inc. Jobs was co-founder and previously served as chief executive of Pixar Animation Studios; he became a member of the board of directors of The Walt Disney Company in 2006, following the acquisition of Pixar by Disney.

In the late 1970s, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak engineered one of the first commercially successful lines of personal computers, the Apple II series. Jobs directed its aesthetic design and marketing along with A.C. “Mike” Markkula, Jr. and others.

In the early 1980s, Jobs was among the first to see the commercial potential of Xerox PARC’s mouse-driven graphical user interface, which led to the creation of the Apple Lisa (engineered by Ken Rothmuller and John Couch) and, one year later, of Apple employee Jef Raskin’s Macintosh. After losing a power struggle with the board of directors in 1985, Jobs left Apple and founded NeXT, a computer platform development company specializing in the higher-education and business markets.

In 1986, he acquired the computer graphics division of Lucasfilm Ltd, which was spun off as Pixar Animation Studios. He was credited in Toy Story (1995) as an executive producer. He remained CEO and majority shareholder at 50.1 percent until its acquisition by The Walt Disney Company in 2006, making Jobs Disney’s largest individual shareholder at seven percent and a member of Disney’s Board of Directors.

In 1996, NeXT was acquired by Apple. The deal brought Jobs back to the company he co-founded, and provided Apple with the NeXTSTEP codebase, from which the Mac OS X was developed.” Jobs was named Apple advisor in 1996, interim CEO in 1997, and CEO from 2000 until his resignation. He oversaw the development of the iMac, iTunes, iPod, iPhone, and iPad and the company’s Apple Retail Stores.

In 2003, Jobs was diagnosed with a rare form of pancreatic cancer. Though it was initially treated, Jobs reported of a hormone imbalance, underwent a liver transplant in 2009, and appeared progressively thinner as his health declined. In August 2011, during his third medical leave, Jobs resigned as CEO, but continued to work for Apple as Chairman of the Board until his death.

On October 5, 2011, he died in his Palo Alto home, aged 56. His death certificate listed respiratory arrest as the immediate cause of death, with “metastatic pancreas neuroendocrine tumor” as the underlying cause. His occupation was listed as “entrepreneur” in the “high tech” business.