Posts Tagged ‘nature’

DOT ONE: When Steve Jobs launched Apple with Steve Wozniak in 1976, they decided to name the company after the fruit that according to legend spurred Isaac Newton’s theories on gravity. Jobs then spent most of his life defying gravity, and defying the odds.

DOT TWO: Starting with the premise that the best ideas are already out there, Jobs negotiated with Xerox to grant Apple engineers access to the Xerox PARC facilities in return for selling them one million dollars in pre-IPO Apple stock. It was from this visit that Jobs collected the ideas behind the fundamentals of today’s PC – the graphic user interface, mouse and pointer.

DOT THREE: How did Jobs go from start-up to listed company in four years? By getting his mentors to work for him. Jobs brought on a local VC, Mike Markkula, who bought shares in the company and subsequently became CEO. He brought in Regis McKenna, the best public relations man in Silicon Valley, to market the Apple II. Markkula was responsible for the early financing of the company, and for taking Apple public in 1980.

DOT FOUR: Despite becoming worth $217 million when Apple listed, Jobs kept relying purely on his intuition. Apple’s head of marketing, Mike Murray, commented, “Steve did his market research by looking into the mirror every morning.” Sales stalled, Jobs’ management style was seen by his board as a liability and, in 1985, he was thrown out of the company he had started nine years earlier.

DOT FIVE: That might have been the end of another entrepreneur story, was it not for Jobs’ perseverance. Having left Apple, he launched NeXT, to provide PCs to the education market. Apple sued Jobs for launching in competition, prompting him to say, “It’s hard to think that a $2 billion company with 4,300 plus people couldn’t compete with six people in blue jeans.” Jobs sold all but one of his Apple shares, and Apple continued to languish, falling from 20% market share to under 5% by 1996. Jobs, in the meantime, struggled with NeXT, burning through $250 million of investors’ money as he tried to market his new computers.

DOT SIX: In the same year that Jobs founded NeXT, George Lucas was looking to sell a small computer animation group he owned. Disney rejected an offer to buy 50% for $15 million, and a deal to sell to Ross Perot and Phillips for $30 million fell through. Jobs ended up negotiating Lucas to under $10 million for the business, thinking he could market the high-end animation computers that the group had designed.

DOT SEVEN: Renamed ‘Pixar’, Jobs’ new company began marketing the Pixar Image Computer to the medical market – with little success. By 1989, with Pixar losing over $1 million each month, and NeXT faring little better, Jobs found himself left with less than 20% of the $150 million he had received when he sold his Apple stock. At the rate he was going, within two years he would be back to zero.

DOT EIGHT: Taking drastic measures, Jobs sold the hardware side of Pixar for several million, taking a massive loss. By luck, an animated short movie the Pixar team produced in their spare time, “Tin Toy”, received an Oscar, and in 1993, Disney approved a full feature joint venture with Pixar called “Toy Story”.

DOT NINE: The victory was short lived with Disney shutting production of Toy Story down later in the year after losing confidence in the script. Then in 1994, Disney lost four executives in a helicopter crash, including Chief Operating Officer Frank Wells. Jobs was left attempting to get Toy Story back on track while also having to close the NeXT manufacturing facility and sales operation. Most of the NeXT team left. The investors, having put in another $100 million, saw that money disappear too. Toy Story, now back on Disney’s agenda, it would need to earn at least $100 million for Pixar to make any money from it at all; more than any other Disney film had made at the time.

DOT TEN: Even so, an audacious Jobs, down to his last dollar, decided to bet that not only would Toy Story be a success, it would enable him to publicly list Pixar and raise further funds. In November 1995, Toy Story opened to enormous acclaim, becoming the highest grossing release of the year, generating over $450 million in sales. One week later, Pixar had its IPO. Less than twelve months after his worst year financially, Steve Jobs was a billionaire.

DOT ELEVEN: Then, in 1996, Gil Emilio (the new CEO of Apple) went hunting for a new operating system and finally found it… in NeXT. Approaching Jobs for his system, Jobs was only interested in selling the entire company. Apple bought it for $377.5 million in cash and $1.5 million in Apple shares. In one fell swoop, Jobs could pay off all his investors and was involved with Apple again – after over ten years.

DOT TWELVE: In 1997 Apple sales were $7 billion and losses were over $1 billion. Jobs took to the challenge of revitalizing Apple. By 1998, Jobs launched the iMac, followed with the iPod, iPhone and iPad. The rise of Apple to become the most valuable company in the world are well documented, but less is known of the trials that shaped Jobs in his darker times.

DOT THIRTEEN: In January 2006, Disney (having rejected the chance to buy 50% of Pixar for $15 million ten years earlier) bought a transformed Pixar from Jobs for $7.4 billion in stock, making Jobs Disney’s largest individual shareholder and a billionaire for the third time.

To become a billionaire is already rare. To become a billionaire from scratch (or from $1 billion in losses) in three entirely different industries is unprecedented.

Jobs died today with a net worth of over $8 billion after having worked for $1 a year for the last 14 years.

Many people have heard his quote “Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me… Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful… that’s what matters to me.”

What most don’t know was that this was from a quote in the Wall Street Journal in Summer 1993 – Not when he was sitting on a billion dollars, but in his darkest days, outcast from Apple and the Tech community, struggling with both NeXT and an aimless Pixar, and about to run out of money.

That was Steve.

Here are some amazing collection of Inspirational and Motivational picture quotes on hard work, talent, success, goals, world, change, and many more things.

Hope you get motivated by them 🙂

 

Gary Vaynerchuk  is a video blogger, co-owner and director of operations of a wine retail store, and an author and public speaker on the subjects of social media, brand building and e-commerce. Vaynerchuk immigrated to the U.S. in 1978, and after graduating from Mount Ida College in Newton, MA, transformed his father’s Springfield, NJ liquor store into a large scale retail wine store named Wine Library, and in 2006 started the video blogWine Library TV, a daily internet webcast on the subject of wine, which launched his career of internet celebrity.

Building Personal Brand Within the Social Media Landscape

Entrepreneurs fret over packaging and a host of other details as they get started, and then leave one of the most important aspects as an afterthought.

The sad truth is that the right name can sometimes make all the difference when it comes to propelling a business to success, rather than just slogging on.

Consider this: Would you like “Patagonian toothfish” on your plate tonight for dinner? Hmm… not so much? Ok what about “Chilean Sea Bass?” That’s much better, right? Or another example is how Marion Morrison put on a cowboy hat, slung on a six-shooter and became “John Wayne.”

Names are quite powerful. I pretty much started as a copywriter. I know that words are incredibly important. Each one has a distinct difference. Get the name right, and you get branding as a by-product of your advertising.

Here are seven things I consider when determining a business-related name:

1. The name needs to sound good when it’s said aloud. I’m a big fan of alliteration, using words that start with the same consonant, Coca-Cola or Jimmy John’s. Just make sure to say it aloud — a lot — and make sure this isn’t a “she sells seashells on the seashore” situation. People need to say the name on the radio, a video or in conversation.

2. Use a name that has meaning to it and conveys a benefit. If you heard it you’d know right away what it is. For example, my first “real” book was called, “Moonlighting on the Internet.” The word “moonlighting” instantly conveyed that this was about using the Internet in your spare time to make extra money. Also make sure the name isn’t too generic. Personally, I think Boston Chicken made a mistake when it changed its name to Boston Market. Don’t try to be everything to everybody with your name.

3. Avoid Web 2.0-ish syndrome. I still don’t know if you spell Flickr with an “er” or not. And I definitely have no idea how to spell delicio.us without looking it up. This sort of mildly dyslexic spelling is so last decade. Potential customers for your new venture of “Computer4You” should be able to easily look up the name, and they shouldn’t be asking whether a “you” is a “u.”

4. Beware initials. They are so boring. Yes, IBM and 3M have gotten away with initials, but these are multibillion-dollar corporations that have been around for decades. You can do the same when you’ve brought in billions of dollars over a hundred years. Until then, rely on a name that is interesting.

5. Use specifics. Don’t use a generic name that doesn’t mean anything. I like names that take advantage of details such as numbers and days. My buddy Tim Ferriss found a pretty specific and compelling name for his book “The 4-Hour Work Week.” Other titles that use numbers to focus in on specifics include “8 Minute Abs” and “5-hour Energy.”

6. Make sure you can trademark the name. Depending on how big you want to build the brand, this is an important consideration. It’s worth it to check USPTO.gov — or a new site called Trademarkia.com— before settling on a name.

7. Test it out on Google AdWords. One of the great features of the “find keywords” tool on AdWordsis that it will list similar search phrases, along with how many global and local monthly searches each are getting. Some AdWords searches with the name you are considering can ensure there isn’t a slightly different name out there that might get more attention on the Internet.

If you really want to get advanced, try to come up with a name that could be eventually used as a verb, or lends itself to the creation of your own “language.” People who go to TED, the conference for Tech, Education and Design, now call themselves “TEDsters.” My company, Maverick Business Adventures, recalls “Maverick Moments” stories about happenings during a trip.

Think it through, and your name will be a multiplier in your favor.

From http://www.youngentrepreneur.com

Courtesy .

How can we defeat this powerful force — our own mind?
Awareness is the key. It’s the start.
1. Start by becoming aware. Become an observer. Start listening to your self talk, observe what your mind does. Pay attention. It’s happening all the time. Meditation helps with this. I also learned through running — by not taking along an iPod, I run in silence, and have nothing to do but watch nature and listen to my mind.
2. Don’t act. Your mind will urge you to eat that cake (“Just a bite!”) or smoke that cigarette or stop running or procrastinate. Listen to what your mind is saying, but don’t act on those instructions. Just sit still (mentally) and watch and listen.
3. Let it pass. The urge to smoke, eat, procrastinate, or quit running … it will pass. It’s temporary. Usually it only lasts a minute or two. Breathe, and let it pass.
4. Beat the rationalizations. You can actively argue with your mind. When it says, “One little bite won’t hurt!”, you should point to your gut and say, “Yeah, that’s what you said all those other times, and now I’m fat!” When it says, “Why are you putting yourself through this pain?”, you should say, “It’s painful to be unhealthy, and it’s only painful to avoid the cake if you look at it as a sacrifice — instead, it can be a joy to embrace healthy and delicious foods, and fitness!”
There are lots of times when “willpower” fails us. These are the times we need to become aware of our minds.
When we are aware, we can change it. This is a small secret, but it’s life changing. It changed my life, because I can now change anything. I watch, and I wait, and I beat it. You can too.

Finding the motivation to carry out our goals is a challenge faced by many people. Though reflecting on areas of your life that need to change is a great starting point, you need motivational drive to actually implement these changes. Many people are skilled at reflecting inward and creating a list of accomplishments and tasks they wish to achieve, but then they stop there. As months and days pass by, they either find themselves criticizing their failures or ignoring their goals altogether. The culprit in all of these scenarios is that people lack the motivation necessary to follow through. However, once you learn how to get and stay motivated, you will be on the path to finding the success and happiness you’ve been looking for.

Here are 6 Fail-Proof ways that you can set and accomplish even your wildest of goals.

Creating Reality-Based Goals

To have motivation, you need to have attainable goals. Nothing is as demotivating as setting targets that are too high to achieve. Wanting to be wealthy or skinny are not only vague and too broad, they are a long road to travel with no end in sight. Instead of wealthy, perhaps all you truly need is to implement a plan to pay down your credit cards. The point is that you need to set concise, clear end targets that you can achieve, or you will become unmotivated very quickly.

Build A Road Map For Each Goal

Now that you have a clear list of realistic end goals you want to achieve, it is time to build motivating road maps. Build a separate map for each area of your life you wish to change. There could be motivation maps for categories such as health, finances, career, relationships or any other area of self improvement that you desire to change.

At the bottom of the page, you would place “start,” which signifies where you are at this moment. At the top of the page, you will write your end goal. The important part of this process is filling in the space in between, which is comprised of smaller goals that will help you stay motivated and on the right track. If you were to plan a drive across the country, you would build your itinerary one step at a time. The same is true with a motivational road map. If your end goal is to change your career, for example, the first target would be getting your resume updated. The next in line might be to commit to checking the want ads every Sunday, and so on.

Celebrate Each Achievement

It is very important that you recognize and celebrate each motivational goal on your map. When you’ve achieved the first step, cross it off and pat yourself on your back. You are finally able to see that you are making progress, one step at a time. In the past, you lost your motivation because you didn’t have a plan in place. Your end goal felt overwhelming and too far away. But now you will stay motivated because you see that your targets are within reach, and each day you are one step closer.

Keep Your Eyes On The Motivational Road In Front Of You

Just like when you are driving, taking your eyes off of the road can be extremely dangerous. You can lose your motivation if your eyes are focused on other drivers out there. All that matters on your path to self improvement is you. It doesn’t matter if someone else has a better job, more money or a better physique. You will stay motivated if you understand that your goals are about being the best you that you can be. They are not about becoming someone else. So don’t get distracted while driving toward your targets and keep your eyes on the horizon.

Use Visualization Techniques For Constant Motivation

Your motivation road maps are your inspiration, so keep them close at hand, and see the progress you’ve made in each area of your life. People are motivated when they can see positive change at a glance. When people try to lose weight, seeing the numbers on the scale go down is very motivating. When a company sees their growth and success on a bar graph, they feel there is nothing they cannot accomplish. The same holds true for your own map. Keep looking at how far you’ve come, post it on a bulletin board or some area where you can be motivated by it each day. In addition, take time to relax and visualize what life will feel like when you reach your end goal.

Don’t Let Detours Keep You From Getting Back On Your Path

It is easy to lose motivation when challenges in life occur. Just like when traveling by car, there can be detours, the car can break down or the road can be closed altogether. Put simply, these things happen in life and cannot be avoided. The trouble lies when a setback permanently disrupts motivation. It is ok to put the car in park for a little while, to get your bearings straight – it doesn’t mean you’ve failed. However, do not let the unexpected erase all of your progress to date. Even the most difficult challenges in life such as loss, health concerns or losing a job, can have their own motivational road maps drawn to keep you on your path to self improvement. Remember that the key to happiness isn’t perfection, it is improving circumstances to be the best they can be. No matter what life hands you or what you need to improve, you will feel happier and more successful if you make a motivation road map for each area of your life, so that you can stay motivated to accomplish real change.