Posts Tagged ‘bill gates’

DOT ONE: When Steve Jobs launched Apple with Steve Wozniak in 1976, they decided to name the company after the fruit that according to legend spurred Isaac Newton’s theories on gravity. Jobs then spent most of his life defying gravity, and defying the odds.

DOT TWO: Starting with the premise that the best ideas are already out there, Jobs negotiated with Xerox to grant Apple engineers access to the Xerox PARC facilities in return for selling them one million dollars in pre-IPO Apple stock. It was from this visit that Jobs collected the ideas behind the fundamentals of today’s PC – the graphic user interface, mouse and pointer.

DOT THREE: How did Jobs go from start-up to listed company in four years? By getting his mentors to work for him. Jobs brought on a local VC, Mike Markkula, who bought shares in the company and subsequently became CEO. He brought in Regis McKenna, the best public relations man in Silicon Valley, to market the Apple II. Markkula was responsible for the early financing of the company, and for taking Apple public in 1980.

DOT FOUR: Despite becoming worth $217 million when Apple listed, Jobs kept relying purely on his intuition. Apple’s head of marketing, Mike Murray, commented, “Steve did his market research by looking into the mirror every morning.” Sales stalled, Jobs’ management style was seen by his board as a liability and, in 1985, he was thrown out of the company he had started nine years earlier.

DOT FIVE: That might have been the end of another entrepreneur story, was it not for Jobs’ perseverance. Having left Apple, he launched NeXT, to provide PCs to the education market. Apple sued Jobs for launching in competition, prompting him to say, “It’s hard to think that a $2 billion company with 4,300 plus people couldn’t compete with six people in blue jeans.” Jobs sold all but one of his Apple shares, and Apple continued to languish, falling from 20% market share to under 5% by 1996. Jobs, in the meantime, struggled with NeXT, burning through $250 million of investors’ money as he tried to market his new computers.

DOT SIX: In the same year that Jobs founded NeXT, George Lucas was looking to sell a small computer animation group he owned. Disney rejected an offer to buy 50% for $15 million, and a deal to sell to Ross Perot and Phillips for $30 million fell through. Jobs ended up negotiating Lucas to under $10 million for the business, thinking he could market the high-end animation computers that the group had designed.

DOT SEVEN: Renamed ‘Pixar’, Jobs’ new company began marketing the Pixar Image Computer to the medical market – with little success. By 1989, with Pixar losing over $1 million each month, and NeXT faring little better, Jobs found himself left with less than 20% of the $150 million he had received when he sold his Apple stock. At the rate he was going, within two years he would be back to zero.

DOT EIGHT: Taking drastic measures, Jobs sold the hardware side of Pixar for several million, taking a massive loss. By luck, an animated short movie the Pixar team produced in their spare time, “Tin Toy”, received an Oscar, and in 1993, Disney approved a full feature joint venture with Pixar called “Toy Story”.

DOT NINE: The victory was short lived with Disney shutting production of Toy Story down later in the year after losing confidence in the script. Then in 1994, Disney lost four executives in a helicopter crash, including Chief Operating Officer Frank Wells. Jobs was left attempting to get Toy Story back on track while also having to close the NeXT manufacturing facility and sales operation. Most of the NeXT team left. The investors, having put in another $100 million, saw that money disappear too. Toy Story, now back on Disney’s agenda, it would need to earn at least $100 million for Pixar to make any money from it at all; more than any other Disney film had made at the time.

DOT TEN: Even so, an audacious Jobs, down to his last dollar, decided to bet that not only would Toy Story be a success, it would enable him to publicly list Pixar and raise further funds. In November 1995, Toy Story opened to enormous acclaim, becoming the highest grossing release of the year, generating over $450 million in sales. One week later, Pixar had its IPO. Less than twelve months after his worst year financially, Steve Jobs was a billionaire.

DOT ELEVEN: Then, in 1996, Gil Emilio (the new CEO of Apple) went hunting for a new operating system and finally found it… in NeXT. Approaching Jobs for his system, Jobs was only interested in selling the entire company. Apple bought it for $377.5 million in cash and $1.5 million in Apple shares. In one fell swoop, Jobs could pay off all his investors and was involved with Apple again – after over ten years.

DOT TWELVE: In 1997 Apple sales were $7 billion and losses were over $1 billion. Jobs took to the challenge of revitalizing Apple. By 1998, Jobs launched the iMac, followed with the iPod, iPhone and iPad. The rise of Apple to become the most valuable company in the world are well documented, but less is known of the trials that shaped Jobs in his darker times.

DOT THIRTEEN: In January 2006, Disney (having rejected the chance to buy 50% of Pixar for $15 million ten years earlier) bought a transformed Pixar from Jobs for $7.4 billion in stock, making Jobs Disney’s largest individual shareholder and a billionaire for the third time.

To become a billionaire is already rare. To become a billionaire from scratch (or from $1 billion in losses) in three entirely different industries is unprecedented.

Jobs died today with a net worth of over $8 billion after having worked for $1 a year for the last 14 years.

Many people have heard his quote “Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me… Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful… that’s what matters to me.”

What most don’t know was that this was from a quote in the Wall Street Journal in Summer 1993 – Not when he was sitting on a billion dollars, but in his darkest days, outcast from Apple and the Tech community, struggling with both NeXT and an aimless Pixar, and about to run out of money.

That was Steve.

Advertisements

#10 – Sheryl Sandberg

Whilst Facebook was certainly very popular before she came on board in 2008, it was difficult to see how the site would make an income worthy of its valuation. Not only did she help meet those expectations that came with such a high valuation of a site yet to make a real income, she helped massively exceed them.

Since she came on board as Facebook’s number two, it’s user base increased more than 10 times to roughly 11% of the world’s population, and the business is on course to post massive profits that are rumoured to cause the company to be valued near the $100 billion mark, which is almost as much as half the GDP of Ireland. It was her task to monetize Facebook, and she did this very successfully.

She would have been much higher in the top ten if it wasn’t for the fact that Facebook was destined to conquer the world on account of it being a very good idea, but everything she was tasked to do, she did very well and deserve her place amongst the top ten women entrepreneurs.

#9 – JK Rowling

This single and struggling mother wrote a book that bought a generation of video gamers and tv addicts back to reading books to excercise their imaginations once again. Another rags to riches story, JK Rowling‘s Harry Potter books have become one of the best-selling books of all time, she managed to spawn a major feature film series and a franchise that also incorporates a fully functioning theme park in direct competition with Disney. Her influence not only affects millions of children around the world, but has also drawn many adults into her world.

#8 – Kate Middleton

Kate Middleton placed higher in the list than JK Rowling despite losing the influential British woman crown to her, but the media coverage speaks volumes. Kate is a woman that is going to take the world by storm as she settles into her role as a British ambassador and style icon. Some may criticize the impact of her charity work when compared to Princess Diana but she is promoting causes close to her heart and she should be applauded.

#7 – Lady Gaga

Whatever you think of her music and fashion tastes, theres no denying that she has become an extraordinary success within a very short space of time and one of the most successful women in music today. Earning Lady Gaga her spot as number 8 in the list of top female entrepreneurs.

Born Stefanie GermanottaLady Gaga is estimated to be worth nearly $100 million at the tender age of 25-years-old. The reason for her fortune is that unlike many of her peers, she actually writes her own music, netting her a huge income in royalties.

#6 – Susan Wojcicki

Susan Wojcicki can certainly claim to be one of the most influential women in business owing to her being Senior Vice President at search engine giant Google, Susan has been responsible for helping to turn a great idea into a very profitable idea. She is mostly in charge of the advertising revenue side of Google.

#5 – Melinda Gates

Although her husband Bill Gates is mostly responsible for their wealth, she has been responsible for talking him into co-founding a charitable organisation with the money made from Bill’s empire. Bill Gates has stated that when he dies, all of his $40 billion fortune will have been spent on good causes. Melinda & Bill Gates have already donated $27 billion to charitable causes.

#4 – Indra Nooyi

Born in Calcutta, India, Indra Nooyi is one of the most powerful women in business having held executive positions in many of the world’s top companies.

She is currently Chairwoman and CEO of Pepsico which is the second largest food and drink company on the planet. She has not only excelled in business but also in academia, earning degrees in Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics as well as an MBA in management in her native India, she then went on to earn a Master’s degree in Public and Private Management at Yale.

#3 – Angela Merkel

Great responsibility rests on this ladies shoulders as leader of Europe’s most powerful and richest economy, Germany. Her influence and persuasion skills are likely to affect millions of Europeans and billions of others around the world. The global economy effectively is in her hands.

Agela Merkel is Germany’s first female leader and her decisions are highly likely to impact the history of Germany.

#2 – Oprah Winfrey

No list of the top women entrepreneurs would be complete without Oprah.

Worth an estimated $2.7 billion, it’s no wonder she can afford to hand out free cars to her audience members, her fortune has been largely down to creating television that women love to watch. And not just being content with appearing on the TV, she has gone on to excel in many other forms of media. As for being influential, she has had president Obama on her show twice, amongst many other world-famous people and has donated 100s of millions to make this world a better place.

#1 – Cher Wang

Cher ranks so highly on this list as she is perhaps arguably the most successful female entrepreneur in the world. Her wealth is primarily of her own making rather than being down to working for a large firm or being born wealthy.

She spent many years manufacturing cell phones for other people which earned her a tidy fortune, it wasn’t until she set-up her own company HTC, that her wealth really took off. She has anestimated worth of $6.8 billion, her HTC smartphones have quickly gain notoriety and in 2010, accounted for 20% of the smartphone market.

You may not have heard of her, but she’s undoubtedly influential and her income is entirely down to her own wits rather than any other factor, that’s why Cher Wang deserves the number one spot on this list of the top ten most influential women entrepreneurs.

All of these women are successful entrepreneurs in their own right. All have had to overcome high odds of failure to reach their ultimate destination, and all have greatly influenced millions of people around the world. These successful female entrepreneurs have added so much to our lives and serve as great inspiration for other women wishing to emulate their successes.

 

From Addicted2success.com Thank You 🙂

Hope you likes it 🙂

Broadly considered a brand that inspires fervour and defines cool consumerism, Apple has become one of the biggest corporations in the world, fuelled by game-changing products that tap into modern desires. Its leader, Steve Jobs, was a long-haired college dropout with infinite ambition, and an inspirational perfectionist with a bully’s temper. A man of contradictions, he fused a Californian counterculture attitude and a mastery of the art of hype with explosive advances in computer technology.

Insiders including Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, the chairman who ousted Jobs from the company he founded, and Jobs’ chief of software, tell extraordinary stories of the rise, fall and rise again of Apple with Steve Jobs at its helm.

With Stephen Fry, world wide web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee and branding guru Rita Clifton, Evan Davis decodes the formula that took Apple from suburban garage to global supremacy.

Bio:
Steven Paul Jobs (February 24, 1955 — October 5, 2011) was an American businessman and inventor widely recognized as a charismatic pioneer of the personal computer revolution. He was co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Apple Inc. Jobs was co-founder and previously served as chief executive of Pixar Animation Studios; he became a member of the board of directors of The Walt Disney Company in 2006, following the acquisition of Pixar by Disney.

In the late 1970s, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak engineered one of the first commercially successful lines of personal computers, the Apple II series. Jobs directed its aesthetic design and marketing along with A.C. “Mike” Markkula, Jr. and others.

In the early 1980s, Jobs was among the first to see the commercial potential of Xerox PARC’s mouse-driven graphical user interface, which led to the creation of the Apple Lisa (engineered by Ken Rothmuller and John Couch) and, one year later, of Apple employee Jef Raskin’s Macintosh. After losing a power struggle with the board of directors in 1985, Jobs left Apple and founded NeXT, a computer platform development company specializing in the higher-education and business markets.

In 1986, he acquired the computer graphics division of Lucasfilm Ltd, which was spun off as Pixar Animation Studios. He was credited in Toy Story (1995) as an executive producer. He remained CEO and majority shareholder at 50.1 percent until its acquisition by The Walt Disney Company in 2006, making Jobs Disney’s largest individual shareholder at seven percent and a member of Disney’s Board of Directors.

In 1996, NeXT was acquired by Apple. The deal brought Jobs back to the company he co-founded, and provided Apple with the NeXTSTEP codebase, from which the Mac OS X was developed.” Jobs was named Apple advisor in 1996, interim CEO in 1997, and CEO from 2000 until his resignation. He oversaw the development of the iMac, iTunes, iPod, iPhone, and iPad and the company’s Apple Retail Stores.

In 2003, Jobs was diagnosed with a rare form of pancreatic cancer. Though it was initially treated, Jobs reported of a hormone imbalance, underwent a liver transplant in 2009, and appeared progressively thinner as his health declined. In August 2011, during his third medical leave, Jobs resigned as CEO, but continued to work for Apple as Chairman of the Board until his death.

On October 5, 2011, he died in his Palo Alto home, aged 56. His death certificate listed respiratory arrest as the immediate cause of death, with “metastatic pancreas neuroendocrine tumor” as the underlying cause. His occupation was listed as “entrepreneur” in the “high tech” business.

From Addictedtosuccess.

dalmur0091 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

musicphilosophy 021 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

musicphilosophy 151 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

musicphilosophy20 161 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

musicphilosophy 061 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

musicphilosophy 041 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

musicphilosophy 031 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

remember by marcusavedis d3emhhn1 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

laugh  live by mazefall d3f7x4j1 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

quotes 2 550x6241 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

apologizing 7kv4x84cp 93785 500 3751 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

bored 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

tumblr lol2op1ygc1qa2wo7o1 5001 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

5754672579 68e123160e1 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

tumblr lntf9rsnwu1qc5laro1 4001 55 Inspiring Quotations That Will Change The Way You Think

 

From Addictedtosuccess.

Hope You Like It. 🙂

The 10 Things Successful People Live By Before They Make It

Here’s a brief study of 10 things that these hungry and unstoppable people did to see the success they all eventually achieved.

1. They didn’t use excuses.

We all have two voices. There’s the voice that tells us to work hard, to focus on the task at hand and to finish it before we move on to the next. And to finish it well.

We also have the voice that tells us to take a break, to think about what’s on TV, or to visit a site that we like to visit that entertains us – whether it’s ESPN.com or facebook.

In life we’re the victim of injustice from time to time. It could be a promotion that we deserve but don’t get. No matter who we are, we’re going to be treated unfairly at some point. We can either feel sorry for ourselves, or push forward and put it behind us – even use it as motivation.

Nelson Mandela could have used his unjust imprisonment as an excuse to give into his anger. Instead, he used it as an opportunity to learn, grow, and eventually free others.

Listen to your excuses. Understand why you have them. Then figure out how you can use them for good.

2. It wasn’t just about them.

‘Things’ can be a motivator, they can even be a reward, but they can’t be the motivator. The truly successful in life always get there because they created change in the lives of others, not just their own.

If something drives you that is greater than just the ‘ends’, we’re going to work harder, longer, and we’re going to give more of ourselves to our project.

Yes we can make money when we have the primary goal of making money. Some might even use that money for good – which is awesome. But there’s no fulfillment in simply making money. And isn’t that the point?

3. Early mornings and late nights.

People who have achieved true success in their lives have worked for it.

This might come at the detriment of other areas of their lives, such as family or social life. But their mission is first and foremost. Until it’s complete, everything else comes second.

There’s literally no substitute for hard work. Abraham Lincoln said, “Things may come to those who wait… but only the things left by those who hustle.” If you want to be successful, you’re going to have to out hustle everyone else.

4. The greatest commodity.

Energy is a huge commodity that is often not talked about. Yes, energy in the sense of fuel and electricity is talked about everywhere, but I’m talking about our own energy levels.

The fact is that the more energy we have, the easier it is to focus, and the higher the quality of our work is.

One of Richard Branson‘s ‘key’s to success’ is staying in great physical shape. So would raised energy levels be the greatest benefit to working out? It may be.

Keeping physically fit gives us greater blood-flow to our brain, enhanced alertness and improved focus. Make training a routine part of your life and increase your chances at success – in every meaning of the word.

5. Principles.

History will be kind to me. For I intend to write it.

Winston Churchill had principles. The difference between him and the rest of us, is that he stuck to his principles at all costs. He didn’t waver when they weren’t popular – an extreme rarity in politics.

What are your principles? All of us should have them, know what they are, and live our lives bythem.

One of Apple’s principles is to bring change to the world through technology, and they do it with every product they release.

Identify what principles you have that guide your life through tough times, and when things couldn’t be any better. They shouldn’t change, and at your core, neither should you.

6. Wavering, yet unbreakable faith.

We all have moments of doubt. Even the best of us question if our dream is going to come true. The one thing that separates the truly successful from those who never reach their true potential is an unbreakable faith in the fact that what they’re doing is right.

Even if they have moments of doubt, they’re soon quelled, where other’s listen to that doubt and let it eat them up and finally they quit.

Have your moments of doubt. You’re human. Just don’t let that doubt eat you up. Instead let it motivate you to prove your optimism right.

7. A reason.

Many of the greatest accomplishments in the world were accomplished by insecure men and women, people who had something to prove to others. A desire to elevate their status and create change that was so strong, that failure is simply never and option.

Abraham Lincoln‘s reason(s) had to do a lot with his view of himself in relation to how other’s viewed him. Where others saw a poor, illiterate boy, Lincoln saw someone capable of achieving more, even if he had to do it completely on his own. He also saw the need for change. A nation that preached freedom wasn’t free. He saw something fundamentally wrong with this and set out to change it. His why wasn’t about him. Which in turn made him one of history’s great men.

Understand why. You have that reason to work when others sleep, to sacrifice a safe life for a risky one with no ceiling. Find it by asking why, and not stopping until you hit your core, emotional reason for wanting to change your status, or the status of others.

8. They persevered when others didn’t.

How does the guy who quit on his dream know how long it would’ve taken him to become a success? He doesn’t. None of us do. It could be tomorrow, or ten years from now.

What separates a lot of the great people we read about in our history books from those we’ve never heard of is the fact that they never quit. Quitting was never an option. They only stopped when they reached their dream. And even then, they created a new mission.

Take James J. Braddock, or even Nelson Mandela, for example. They didn’t achieve their greatness or success early on in their careers or in life like some. They achieved it after surviving. They survived while others literally died, or quit. In their cases it wasn’t just that they were the best, but they were the best because of what they endured. They were the last one’s standing.

We don’t know when our breakthrough will come. So don’t guarantee your failure by quitting. You can adapt, change, and evolve, but never, never, never quit.

9. Great people relentlessly studied their craft.

Tony Gwynn and Mike Tyson studied their craft as much as anyone. Gwynn spent hours upon hours studying opposing pitchers. He studied their patterns. He wasn’t the most athletic guy around, but he put his work in to be the best at what he did: hit baseballs.

When people think of Tyson, they think of an animal, but what we fail to see is the student. No one studied boxing like Tyson did. Watched more film than anyone in the history of the sport. He was a student first, a fighter second.

These great athletes studied film, but how can we perfect our craft?

Using myself as an example; much of my job has to do with writing, and obviously fitness. So, I study those two things. I read books about how to become a better writer, ways to connect with the reader, and I simply read great books written by authors who are much better at writing than I am. If you’re in sales, read and study sales. If you’re a marketer, then do the same with marketing.

Being a drone that simply goes through the motions is no way to achieve greatness. Assuming success is something you want, you have to study your craft, whatever it may be. Learn it inside and out. Build a wealth of knowledge. It’ll help you create great, inspiring, and unique work.

10. Risk.

No risk, no reward. Yes it’s an over-used, cliché of a phrase. But it’s true. Those who have achieved real success have often risked the most to get there.

There have been billions of people throughout history who have had the ability to achieve greatness, whether it was the talent or smarts, they had it. What they didn’t have was the guts to risk the life that they were living. They also didn’t have the work ethic to see their talent realized.

The greatest tragedy in life is wasted talent ~ A Bronx Tale

Your big, audacious dream might be to marry the girl of your dreams and have a family with her. You risk might be to leave the career that you love in order to support her and your family. Your dream might be to help millions live longer, healthier lives. Whatever your dream is, give it enough of a chance to be realized.

Risk if you truly want to see the reward.

Find your dream. Then risk everything to get it.

 

From Addictedtosuccess.